Kasparov and the Machine, Part 2

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In a 2003 chess game between Kasparov and the chess engine Fritz, the latter abruptly resigned a complicated position. This was unpredictable to the extent that it had never happened before. (That is, no computer program had ever resigned a game unless it was at a distinct material disadvantage or had detected an invincible mating threat.)

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Even the designers of the program were surprised by the outcome, which they had supposed was practically impossible. Somehow, the machine must have concluded: My position is hopelessly weak and this guy Kasparov is too good to make a blunder at this point.

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We might even wonder: did the machine consider Kasparov a sort of computer like itself – such that it (i.e., Kasparov) would inevitably take advantage of the weakness that it (i.e., Fritz) detected in its own position? If so, we would have a kind of reverse Turing situation: in which a machine attributes machine-like intelligence to a human.

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1269891

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